Reading Comprehension Questions for Banking Exams
Reading Comprehension Questions for Banking Exams
SBI PO Free Mock Test 2022

English Reading Comprehension Questions

Reading Comprehension Practice Test. Reading Comprehension based on different editorial like; The Hindu, Economics Times, Times of India etc. If you are preparing for Banking and Insurance Exams, you will come across Reading Comprehension Test in English language section. Here we are providing you English Reading Comprehension Test for Banking Exams , based on the latest pattern of your daily practice.

Reading Comprehension Test will help you learn concepts on important topics in English Section. This “English Reading Comprehension Test for Banking Exams” is also important for other banking exams such as SBI Clerk, IDBI Executive and Syndicate PO, IBPS PO, IBPS Clerk, SBI Clerk, IBPS RRB Officer, IBPS RRB Office Assistant, IBPS SO, SBI SO and other competitive exams.

Reading Comprehension Test for Banking Exams | Set –9


Directions: (1-10) Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions. Certain words are in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

Thirty-six years ago, when I was working with Macmillan India as Branch Editor-South, the early biographies and autobiographies of film stars and celebrities were just emerging in India’s highly conservative book market dominated by imports. Macmillan, the colossus of educational publishing, hesitated before entering this space.

Suddenly, and without any notice at all, the managing director’s office in Bangalore published a fairly lavish book on Sunil Gavaskar. Under pressure to produce something similar, my vice-president, R. Narayanaswamy, who was a friend of a bookish minister of the time, wondered whether we could do a book on Chief Minister M.G. Ramachandran.

So, little was known about this super-star, the mystery man of Tamil Nadu: a Malayali who had captivated a generation with his light skin, impressive physique and carefully selected roles that showed him as the protector of the poor. He had a talent for comedy too that was never fully exploited by any director because the public yearned for an impossibly grand hero who could make them forget their real-life sorrows.

Delicate enquiries were sent to MGR. And yes, he was open to the idea of a book on himself but wished to narrate it himself. An autobiography? Our dreams took flight and one morning the three of us set off for Ramapuram Gardens on the outskirts of Madras where MGR lived. The Minister, Narayanaswamy, and I.

We drove into the curiously bare compound with a dry fountain in the front of a large ‘garden house’ style building. My memory is a bit hazy but I don’t think there were too many policemen or security personnel around. Someone met us on the steps of the porch. A large photograph of a woman dressed in traditional Nair mode hung in the verandah over the entrance. “That is MGR’s mother,” whispered the minister as we were led in. “This way,” said a man dressed in dazzling white. We were shown into a dimly lit room with two air-conditioners and asked to seat ourselves on a U-shaped sofa. It was blazing outside but we were shivering.

In a short while a door opened and in stepped the legend of Tamil cinema: the hope of millions and the man on whose film posters women famously slept. He shifted his dark glasses very slightly to study us. He would not let us stand up, seated himself very quickly and turned to the minister: “Wasani variliya?” (So, Wasani didn’t come?”) Sharad Wasani was managing director of Macmillan and he was supposed to have joined us. The Chief Minister had done his homework!

His voice was both rough and sweet — a peculiar mix. He suppressed a smile at my Tamil and guessed from Narayanaswamy’s accent that he was from Palghat. Some pleasantries were exchanged in Malayalam-Tamil and in English before he stood up saying, “Let’s eat before the idlis go cold.”

He led us to a large but simply furnished dining room. He asked me to sit facing him and waved the minister and Narayanaswamy to the further end of the table. We ended up speaking very loudly to each other. Along with fluffy idlis and appams came sambar and chutneys — and fish curry. He himself had a large glass of buttermilk and dried fish and what looked like pieces of roast chicken. Not a single piece of carbohydrate passed his lips.

“Say something…” he said, and we desperately tried to make conversation. In an attempt to say something complimentary I pointed to his buttermilk and said, “So that is the secret of your complexion?” He stopped eating, tilted his head very slightly, smiled and said something that I cannot record here for posterity, but everyone laughed with relief over the fact that a successful personal exchange had been accomplished.

After breakfast we went back to the dark, freezing room and he said: “Look here… I cannot write but there is a lot I’d like to say. Shall I tape what I remember about my life and will you make that into a book?” As the publishing plan unfolded, he said something I must share. “You know, when I’m faced with a complex problem of government I think of the roles I played and wonder what those characters might have done in a similar situation. It always helps me decide what will benefit the poor.”

He came all the way to the porch to see us off. Macmillan did not publish the book after all, but the image of MGR as we pulled away from the porch is still clear in my memory — arm raised, eyes screened, and that confident half-smile.

1. According to the passage, what is an autobiography?

A. a book on a person narrated by that person’s family
B. a book written by a famous person
C. a book on a person narrated by that person himself
D. a book written by a famous person on some other famous person
E. a book written by a famous person on a friend

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Correct Answer: C. a book on a person narrated by that person himself

2. How did MGR want to write his autobiography?

A. by writing about only the important events of his life
B. by collecting the snippets of the movies he had done
C. by recording his life events in a tape
D. by recording his life events in the form of dialogues
E. by drawing his charter-sketch and letting the author turn it into a book

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Correct Answer – C. by recording his life events in a tape

3. Why did R. Narayanaswamy propose the idea of doing book on Chief Minister M.G. Ramachandran?

A. under the pressure of a similar publication from a competitor’s office
B. in cue to the success of similar books in the market
C. with an aim of diversifying the content offered by Macmillan
D. under the pressure of a similar publication from the managing director’s office
E. All of the above

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Correct Answer – D. under the pressure of a similar publication from the managing director’s office

4. What made the author say, “The Chief Minister had done his homework!”?

A. his remark on the duo’s dressing style
B. the way he was dressed
C. his remark on the absent managing director
D.  his thoroughly planned schedule
E.  the way he walked into the room

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Correct Answer – C. his remark on the absent managing director

5. Which of the following has been used to describe MGR in the passage?

I. a man with a high women following

II. the hope of millions

III. the legend of Tamil cinema

A. Both (I) and (II)
B. Both (II) and (III)
C. Only (III)
D. Only (II)
E. All (I), (II) and (III)

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Correct Answer – E. All (I), (II) and (III)

6. Why was M.G. Ramachandran’s talent for comedy never exploited by any director?

A. the viewers did not like his comedy roles
B. the viewers were more interested in seeing him as a super-hero
C. there were not many writers writing comedy scripts at that time
D. M.G. Ramachandran himself did not want to do comedy
E.  there were not enough resources available for producing comedy movies

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Correct Answer – B. the viewers were more interested in seeing him as a super-hero

7. Which of the following is closest in meaning to the word Emerging as used in the passage?

A. Disturbing
B. Evolving
C. Unfolding
D. Replete
E. Amassing

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Correct Answer – C. Unfolding

Explanation: The word Emerging means become apparent or prominent; which is similar in meaning to the word Unfolding, as it means gradually developing or being revealed.

8.Which of the following is closest in meaning to the word Yearn as used in the passage?

A. Reflect
B. Desire
C. Engage
D. Held
E. Suppress

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Correct Answer – B. Desire

9. Which of the following is farthest in meaning from the word Dazzling as used in the passage?

A. Rectitude
B. Solitude
C. Platitude
D. Multitude
E. Subdued

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Correct Answer – E. Subdued

Explanation: The word Dazzling means extremely bright, especially so as to blind the eyes temporarily, whereas the word Subdued means soft and restrained.

10.Which of the following is farthest in meaning from the word Lavish as used in the passage?

A. Frugal
B. Banal
C. Peripheral
D. Trivial
E. Colossal

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Correct Answer – A. Frugal

Explanation: The word Lavish means very generous or extravagant, whereas the word Frugal means sparing or economical about money or food.

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