Logical Reasoning Questions and Answers : Statement and Argument Set – 4

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Logical Reasoning Questions and Answers

Logical Reasoning Questions and Answers for IBPS Clerk Mains. Welcome to the www.letsstudytogether.co online Reasoning section. If you are preparing for upcoming IBPS and Insurance Exams 2017, you will come across a section on Logical Reasoning (Statement And Argument) in Reasoning Ability Section. Here we are providing you Logical Reasoning Questions and Answers: Statement and Argument for IBPS Clerk Mains based on the latest pattern of your daily practice.

This Logical Reasoning Questions and Answers: Statement and Argument Quiz is also important for other banking exams such as IBPS PO, IBPS Clerk, SBI Clerk, IBPS RRB Officer, IBPS RRB Office Assistant, IBPS SO, SBI SO and other competitive exams.

Logical Reasoning Questions and Answers: Set – 4


1.In the question given below is a statement followed by three courses of action numbered I, II and III. A course of action is a step or administrative decision to be taken for improvement, follow up, or further action in regard to problem, policy etc. On the basis of the information given in the statement, you have to assume everything in the statement to be true and then decide which of the three given course (s) of action logically follow (s).

Statement: The problem of impaired credit has worsened over the last two years, with the NPA of all the public sector banks touching 4.5% of their total advances, which is a cause of worry for both the government and the depositors.
Courses of Action:
I. The branch managers should be advised to be more aggressive in disbursing advances
II. The sanctioning authority of the loans should be vigilant in scrutinizing the applications and requisite documents before sanction of the loan
III. The branch managers should be advised to constantly follow up with the defaulters for recovery of the due amount and approach the Debt Recovery Tribunal on timely basis.
a. Only I follows
b. Only II follows
c. Only III follows
d. Only II and III follow
e. None follow

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D. Only II and III follow

The banks need to be careful while disbursing loans and should try and recover as much money from the defaulters as possible.

2.In making decisions about important questions, it is desirable to be able to distinguish between ‘strong’ arguments and ‘weak’ arguments, ‘Strong’ arguments are those which are both important and directly related to the questions.‘Weak’ arguments are those which are of minor importance and also may not be directly related to the question or may be related to a trivial aspect of the question.
The question below is followed by three arguments numbered I, II and III. You have to decide which of the arguments a ‘strong’ argument is and which a ‘weak’ argument is.
Statement: 
Should all the deemed universities be derecognized and attached to any of the central or state universities of India?
Arguments:
I. Yes, many of these deemed universities do not conform to the required standards of a full-fledged university and hence the level of education is compromised
II. No, these deemed universities have been able to introduce innovative courses suitable to the requirement of various industries as they are free from strict government controls
III. Yes, many such universities are basically money spinning activities and education takes a backseat in these institutions
a. Only I and II are strong
b. Only II and III are strong
c. Only I and III are strong
d. All I, II and III are strong
e. None of the above

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C. Only I and III are strong

Higher learning institutions like Universities should provide highest quality education. So, I and III are strong.

3.In making decisions about important questions, it is desirable to be able to distinguish between ‘strong’ arguments and ‘weak’ arguments, ‘Strong’ arguments are those which are both important and directly related to the questions.‘Weak’ arguments are those which are of minor importance and also may not be directly related to the question or may be related to a trivial aspect of the question.
The question below is followed by three arguments numbered I, II and III. You have to decide which of the arguments a ‘strong’ argument is and which a ‘weak’ argument is.
Statement:
Should there be a cap on drawing groundwater for irrigation purposes in India?
Arguments:
I. No, irrigation is of prime importance for food production in India and it is heavily dependent on groundwater in many parts of the country
II. Yes, water tables have gone down to alarmingly low levels in some parts of the country where irrigation is primarily dependent on groundwater, which may lead to serious environmental consequences
III. Yes, India just cannot afford to draw groundwater any further as the international agencies have cautioned against it
a. Only I and II are strong
b. Only II and III are strong
c. Only I and III are strong
d. All I, II and III are strong
e. None of these

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A. Only I and II are strong

International agencies may not be knowing the ground realities and thus the argument is not strong.

4. In making decisions about important questions, it is desirable to be able to distinguish between ‘strong’ arguments and ‘weak’ arguments, ‘Strong’ arguments are those which are both important and directly related to the questions.‘Weak’ arguments are those which are of minor importance and also may not be directly related to the question or may be related to a trivial aspect of the question.
The question below is followed by three arguments numbered I, II and III. You have to decide which of the arguments a ‘strong’ argument is and which a ‘weak’ argument is.
Statement:
Should road repair work in big cities be carried out only late at night?
Arguments:
I. No, this way the work will never get completed
II. No, there will be unnecessary use of electricity
III. Yes, the commuters will face lot of problems due to repair work during the day
a. None is strong
b. Only I is strong
c. Only II is strong
d. Only III is strong
e. Only either I or II is strong

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D. Only III is strong

I and II are not strong. Commuters getting hassled during daytime is a valid argument.

5.In making decisions about important questions, it is desirable to be able to distinguish between ‘strong’ arguments and ‘weak’ arguments, ‘Strong’ arguments are those which are both important and directly related to the questions.‘Weak’ arguments are those which are of minor importance and also may not be directly related to the question or may be related to a trivial aspect of the question.
The question below is followed by three arguments numbered I, II and III. You have to decide which of the arguments a ‘strong’ argument is and which a ‘weak’ argument is.
Statement:
Should there be a restriction on the construction of high rise buildings in big cities in India?
Arguments:
I. No, big cities in India do not have adequate open land plots to accommodate the growing population
II. Yes, only the builders and developers benefit from the construction of high rise buildings
III. Yes, the govt. should first provide adequate infrastructural facilities to existing buildings before allowing the construction of new high rise buildings
a. Only II is strong
b. Only III is strong
c. Only I and III are strong
d. Only I is strong
e. None of these

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D. Only I is strong

Growing population and inadequate land is a valid argument for constructing high rise buildings.

6.Animals with a certain behavioral disorder have unusually high level of magnesium in their brain tissue. According to a study, a silicon-based compound binds to magnesium and prevents it from affecting the brain tissue. Therefore,animals can be cured of the disorder by being treated with the compound.
The argument is based on which one of the following assumptions?
a. Animals with the disorder have unusually high but invariable levels of magnesium in their brain tissue.
b. Magnesium is the cause of the disorder rather than merely an effect of it.
c. Introducing the compound into the brain tissue has no side effects.
d. Magnesium is never present in normal brain tissue.
e. The amount of the compound needed to neutralize the magnesium in an animal’s brain tissue varies depending upon the species.

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B. Magnesium is the cause of the disorder rather than merely an effect of it.

The argument states that animals with a certain behavioral disorder have unusually high level of magnesium in their brain tissue. Further, it states that a silicon-based compound binds to magnesium and prevents it from affecting the brain tissue, and this technique can be used to cure animals. The argument therefore, assumes that magnesium is the cause of the disorder. It could also have been possible that increased level of magnesium is an effect of the disorder. However, the solution assumes that it is in fact the cause. Therefore, the need to curb magnesium in the brain. The second option is the most appropriate.

7.Blood banks will shortly start to screen all donors for NANB hepatitis. Although the new screening tests are estimated to disqualify up to 5 percent of all prospective blood donors, they will still miss two-thirds of donors carrying NANB hepatitis. Therefore, about 10 percent of actual donors will still supply NANB-contaminated blood.
The argument above depends on which of the following assumptions?
a. The estimate of the number of donors who would be disqualified by tests for NANB hepatitis is an underestimate.
b. The incidence of NANB hepatitis is lower among the potential blood donors than it is in the population at large.
c. The donors who will still supply NANB-contaminated blood will donate blood at the average frequency for all donors.
d. Donors carrying NANB hepatitis do not, in a large percentage of cases, carry other infections for which reliable screening tests are routinely performed.
e. Donors carrying NANB hepatitis do not, in a large percentage of cases, develop the disease themselves at any point

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D. Donors carrying NANB hepatitis do not, in a large percentage of cases, carry other infections for which reliable screening tests are routinely performed.

8.Radio interferometry is a technique for studying details of celestial objects that combines signals intercepted by widely spaced radio telescopes. This technique requires ultraprecise timing, exact knowledge of the locations of the telescopes, and sophisticated computer programs. The successful interferometric linking of an Earth-based radio telescope with a radio telescope on an orbiting satellite was therefore a significant technological accomplishment.
Which of the following can be correctly inferred from the statements above?
a. Special care was taken in the launching of the satellite so that the calculations of its orbit would be facilitated.
b. The location of an orbiting satellite relative to locations on Earth can be well enough known for interferometric purposes.
c. The resolution of detail achieved by the satellite-Earth interferometer system is inferior to that achieved by exclusively terrestrial systems.
d. The signals received on the satellite are stronger than those received by a terrestrial telescope.
e. The computer programs required for making use of the signals received by the satellite required a long time for development.

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B. The location of an orbiting satellite relative to locations on Earth can be well enough known for interferometric purposes.

The information states that Radio interferometry requires exact knowledge of the locations of the telescopes for accurate calculations and results. Since this technique was successfully used to link an Earth-based radio telescope with a radio telescope on an orbiting satellite, it can be inferred that the location of an orbiting satellite relative to locations on Earth can be well enough known for interferometric purposes. The second option is the most appropriate.

9. Since a Minister’s election campaign for Saharanpur’s bus service began four months ago, morning automobile traffic into the main area of the city has decreased by twenty percent. During the same period, there has been an equivalent rise in the number of persons riding buses into the main area of the city. Obviously, the Minister’s campaign has convinced many people to leave their private vehicles at home and ride the bus to work.
Which of the following, if true, casts the most serious doubt on the conclusion drawn above?
a. The MLA of Saharanpur rides the bus to into the city’s main area.
b. The number of buses entering the main area of Saharanpur during the morning hours is exactly the same now as it was one year ago.
c. Surveys show that longtime bus riders are no more satisfied with the city bus service than they were before the MLA’s campaign began.
d. Road reconstruction has greatly reduced the number of lanes available to commuters in major streets leading to the main area during the past six months.
e. Fares for all bus routes in Saharanpur have risen an average of ten percent during the past six months.

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D. Road reconstruction has greatly reduced the number of lanes available to commuters in major streets leading to the main area during the past six months.

The information states that it was the Minister’s campaign which prompted people to use public transportation, resulting in a fall in the morning automobile traffic. Any information which states that it was not the campaign but some other reason altogether which resulted in the fall in the traffic would weaken the conclusion. Therefore, the fourth option is the most appropriate, since it states that it was the unavailability of lanes due to a construction project that promoted the people to switch to public transportation.

10. In India, where palm trees are non-native, the flowers have traditionally been pollinated by hand, which has kept palm fruit productivity unnaturally low. When weevils known to be efficient pollinators of palm flowers were introduced into India in 1989, palm fruit productivity increased—by up to sixty percent in some areas—but then decreased sharply in 1994.
Which of the following statements, if true, would best explain the 1994 decrease in productivity?
a. The weevil population in Asia remained at approximately the same level between 1989 and 1994.
b. Prices for palm fruit fell between 1989 and 1994 following the rise in production and a concurrent fall in demand.
c. Imported trees are often more productive than native trees because the imported ones have left behind their pests and diseases in their native lands.
d. Prior to 1989 another species of insect-pollinated the Asian palm trees, but not as efficiently as the species of weevil that was introduced in 1989.
e. Rapid increases in productivity tend to deplete trees of nutrients needed for the development of the fruit-producing female flowers.

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E. Rapid increases in productivity tend to deplete trees of nutrients needed for the development of the fruit-producing female flowers.

The information states that traditionally, the productivity of palm fruit was low. However, when weevils, which are known to be efficient pollinators of palm flowers were introduced into India in 1989, palm fruit productivity increased—by up to sixty percent in some areas. However, the productivity decreased in 1994. The best possible explanation for this would be that the rapid increase in productivity by 60% resulted in the depletion of the nutrients in trees needed for the development of the fruit-producing female flowers. Prices of the fruit does not determine the productivity of the tree. Rather, it has to be the other way around. Productivity affects supply and demand and subsequently, the prices. Since the first option states that the weevil population in Asia remained at approximately the same level between 1989 and 1994, it suggests that there must have been no change in the pollination process.In sum, the fifth option is the most appropriate


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